Monday, December 26, 2011

10 Most Viewed Ads on YouTube in 2011

 YouTube counted more than 1 trillion playbacks on the video-sharing site this year, or roughly 140 views for every person on Earth. YouTube isn't serving all that video content without some serious advertising. The video site also shared the most-watched ads on YouTube in 2011, enlisted with the help of  Advertising Age’s Michael Learmonth.

This Volkswagen ad, "The Force" led the top 10 most-watched ads, while this Chevy ad came in third. Both were Super Bowl ads.

However, most of the ads never aired on broadcast TV, which illustrates the opportunity YouTube has going forward for pairing ads with original content.

These included T-Mobile's Royal Wedding at No. 2, and DC Shoe's Gymkhana Four, at No. 4. Both were exclusive to YouTube.

As a side note, "The Force" also managed to make the list of the 10 most-viewed YouTube videos of 2011, not just ads. It snuck in at No. 9.

So sit back and enjoy the embedded most watched video ads of the year. Some of these you might have already seen, and some may seem a complete surprise. Enjoy.

1. VOLKSWAGEN - THE FORCE



2. T-MOBILE - ROYAL WEDDING



3. CHRYSLER - BORN OF FIRE



4. DC SHOES - GYMKHANA FOUR



5. SMARTWATER - JENNIFER ANISTON



6. HOT WHEELS - WORLD RECORD JUMP



7. OLD SPICE - SCENT VACATION



8. APPLE - INTRODUCING THE SIRI ON IPHONE 4S



9. SAMSUNG - UNLEASH YOUR FINGERS



10. ADIDAS - ADIZERO ROSE 2 - THE BULL



What does this mean for brands out there? Here is what the YouTube Blog has to say:

For brands, creating great content—advertainment, if you will—isn’t just for big TV events like the Super Bowl anymore. Increasingly, advertisers and their agencies are focusing on the content and the strategy, and letting that content distribute itself. That doesn’t mean they aren’t doing traditional advertising. Indeed all of these campaigns were backed up by significant spending to seed and promote these videos on YouTube and elsewhere. But paid media only gets you so far. In the end, it doesn’t matter if they paid $3 million for 30-seconds in the Super Bowl or much less to get the conversation started.

In the end, it’s the content that counts.